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College Degree Nearly Doubles Annual Earnings,
Census Bureau Reports
   

     New information from the U.S. Census Bureau reinforces the value of a college education: workers 18 and over with a bachelorís degree earn an average of $51,206 a year, while those with a high school diploma earn $27,915. Workers with an advanced degree make an average of $74,602, and those without a high school diploma average $18,734.

     According to new tables released on the Internet titled Educational Attainment in the United States: 2004, 85 percent of those age 25 or older reported they had completed at least high school and 28 percent had attained at least a bachelorís degree ó both record highs.

     Other highlights for the population 25 years and over in 2004:

  • Minnesota, Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska had the highest proportions of people with at least a high school diploma, all around 91 percent.
     
  • The District of Columbiaís population had the highest proportion with a bachelorís degree or higher at 45.7 percent, followed by Massachusetts (36.7 percent), Colorado (35.5 percent), New Hampshire (35.4 percent) and Maryland (35.2 percent).
     
  • At the regional level, the Midwest had the highest proportion of high school graduates (88.3 percent), followed by the Northeast (86.5 percent), the West (84.3 percent) and the South (83.0 percent).
     
  • The Northeast had the highest proportion of college graduates (30.9 percent), followed by the West (30.2 percent), the Midwest (26.0 percent) and the South (25.5 percent).
     
  • High school graduation rates for women continued to exceed those of men, 85.4 percent and 84.8 percent, respectively. On the other hand, men continued to have a higher proportion of their population with a bachelorís degree or higher (29.4 percent compared with 26.1 percent).
     
  • Non-Hispanic whites had the highest proportion with a high school diploma or higher (90.0 percent), followed by Asians (86.8 percent), African-Americans (80.6 percent) and Hispanics (58.4 percent).
     
  • Asians had the highest proportion with a bachelorís degree or higher (49.4 percent), followed by Non-Hispanic whites (30.6 percent), African-Americans (17.6 percent) and Hispanics (12.1 percent).
     
  • The proportion of the foreign-born population with a high school diploma (67.2 percent) was lower than that of the native population (88.3 percent). However, the percentages with a bachelorís degree or more were not statistically different (27.3 percent and 27.8 percent, respectively).

    The data on educational trends and attainment levels are shown by characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, occupation, industry, nativity and, if foreign-born, when they entered the country. The tables also describe the relationship between earnings and educational attainment. Although the statistics are primarily at the national level, some data are shown for regions and states.

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The data were collected in the Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS). As in all surveys, the CPS data are subject to sampling variability and other sources of error.

For further information on the source of the data and accuracy of the estimates, including standard errors and confidence intervals, go to Appendix G of <http://www.census.gov/apsd/techdoc/cps/cpsmar04.pdf>.


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Copyright 2006 Latino Boom: An Anthology of U.S. Latino Literature, Pearson Education, Inc.
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Last Updated: November 07, 2010